Paralyzed Dog with a Big Heart

Dog Is My CoPilot gives second chances to rescue animals all over the Southwest.  Many of these animals are in good health, but just don’t have a place to call home.  Sometimes, we transport animals like Ellie, that will need extra support,  and a little extra time to find the right forever home.

Green Heart Rescue and a second chance for Ellie

Senior dogs and animals with special needs require extra support and a special touch when our partners are trying to find each one a new family.Green Heart Rescue provides second chances to dogs with special needs, which includes senior dogs which often make up a higher percentage of animals in shelters.  By focusing on dogs that may be overlooked in shelters, Green Heart Rescue is saving dogs that are not normally so lucky.

Ellie teaches us as much as we teach her

Ellie is one of those dogs with special needs that Green Heart Rescue is focused on saving.  Ellie is paralyzed in her rear legs which means she needs to use a dog wheelchair.  Although the wheelchair creates extra steps and adds challenges for her caregivers, she still has a high quality of life and has much to offer a family.

“She’s living her best life with us, where she’ll always know what it means to be a dog, even though she’s paralyzed…to explore the world, to know love from a human and to enjoy the rest of her life in happiness,” said Shannon Benecke, Founder & Director on Green Heart Rescue.  “Ellie is teaching everyone she meets, that physical limitations do not mean that you need to have a limited life.”

 

Our Partners make animal rescue work

Dog Is My CoPilot is proud of our partners that are able to provide second chances to animals with special needs or medical issues.  Dog Is My CoPilot provides transportation for these rescue animals, but without the support of organizations like Green Heart Rescue, we would not be able to transport animals like Ellie.  As we are about to enter the holiday giving season, please consider making a donation to your local animal adoption center or help us to fly more animals to safety with a  tax-deductible donation to Dog Is My Copilot.

 

A New Focus on Animal Services

Dog Is My CoPilot has been on the leading edge of animal rescue organizations since its inception in 2012. Our model of flying dogs and cats from overcrowded shelters to no-kill adoption centers has saved thousands of animals and helped them continue their journey home. Our experience led our executive director, Kara Pollard, to be involved in a new working group, within the Humane Animal Support Services called Pet Supply & Demand.

What is the Humane Animal Support Services (HASS)

Humane Animal Support Services (HASS) is a partnership of 30 animal focused  organizations, many of which are already shelter partners with Dog Is My CoPilot.  The goal of HASS is to shift the focus of animal services towards keeping owned pets together with their families and expedite the path for animals out of shelters. HASS is a community collaboration led by American Pets Alive! and powered by incredible partners, including Maddie’s Fund, South Fork Foundation, Michelson Found Animals Foundation, Pedigree Foundation, Petfinder, and Brandywine SPCA.

Pet Supply and Demand

One working group created by HASS, Pet Supply & Demand, is studying ways to determine how to quantify supply and demand of shelter animals in America, creating a more efficient flow from city to city. The team is trying to develop a way to overcome obstacles that exist in the movement of pets by collecting research and data that can help quantify what cities have excess animals (potential euthanasia) and which communities need pets to fill demand from families looking to adopt a new animals.  They will then create a framework for shelters to connect and more effectively communicate around the transport of animals and their care. Finally, with all this information and data, the working group will help solve any obstacles in transportation from both the receiving and contributing shelters.

 

 

Stronger Partnerships: Stronger support

We are ecstatic that our executive director, Kara Pollard will be a part of this international working group helping to shape how the world of animal sheltering advances.  Animal rescue and sheltering has completely changed over the past few months, with community based fostering becoming the norm. It’s a big shift, and not without its growing pains, but it’s one that the animal services industry has been hoping would happen over the past few years.  Dog Is My CoPilot will be able to lean on these new partnerships to rescue more dogs across the southwest and we’ll share our learning to help other organizations in different geographic locations.

 

California Littles Camp A Partnership with the Humane Society of Western Montana 

Many of the animals we relocate to Montana end up participating in the Critter Camp at the Humane Society of Western Montana.  This program, which is designed for 7-11 year olds, helps children build a sense of kindness, respect and responsibility for all animals and life.

Each camp runs Tuesday through Friday allowing participants to meet new friends while caring for shelter pets, build self-esteem and confidence, in both two-legged and four-legged participants.  During the week, participants care for adoptable cats, participate in clicker training dogs, and baking dog biscuits!  Kids leave camp inspired to be animal ambassadors at home, in their neighborhood and in their community, while sharing what they have learned with their family, friends and neighbors.

 
The Humane Society of Western Montana has programs for older kids!

The Junior Pet Trainer Camp allows 12-14 year olds to work behind the scenes with certified Professional Dog Trainers and assist HSWM staff.  They help with behavior modification, clicker training and upon completion of camp, will be eligible to walk and train shelter dogs. This is another example of the importance of involving young people with shelters and allowing them to help in the animal adoption process.

Thanks to this amazing partnership dozens of small dogs and puppies will have a second chance to find a loving forever home.  Our overcrowded partner shelters in the southwest often do not have the space to house additional animals and struggle to find adopters in their local community.  To avoid needless euthanasia, these animals receive a second chance with Dog Is My CoPilot and the Humane Society of Western Montana where they will be part of an exceptional program and find loving forever homes in Montana.

To learn more about the camp visit: http://myhswm.org/services/humane-education/critter-camp

Be part of the change for shelter animals

Covid-19 and helping shelter animals

We know that Coronavirus is a concerning topic for people everywhere, including pet lovers. The virus is impacting every part of our life and can be especially worrisome for animal lovers. 

Many cities and states are issuing stay at home ordinances to #flattenthecurve of coronavirus.  Animal adoption centers are in turn seeing a reduction in visits, volunteers, and adoptions at their centers.  Many shelters have had to close completely except for essential staff to care for the animals. The dramatic downturn of adoptions, as people are avoiding being in public places, are leading shelters to be overloaded with animals of all types and no room to care for them.

Fostering: How you can help

As shelters adoption centers across the country reach maximum capacity, most non-essential personnel at county shelters have been asked to work remotely. This means that most county run shelters have minimal staff onsite to feed, exercise and play with the animals. As a result, the need for emergency foster families is growing. 

By fostering, you’ll not only save a life of an animal by creating space for another homeless pet, but you’ll ensure that the animal you foster has a loving family and is well cared for during this crisis.  Because of the uncertainty with COVID 19, you might be asked to foster an animal for up to six weeks. Foster families are needed for all types of pets especially medium to large dogs and those with medical issues.  Please contact your local animal adoption center to find out how you can sign-up to become an emergency foster today.

We are by no means the experts on the coronavirus but there are many resources out there.  Currently, scientists believe that pets are not able to transfer the coronavirus. We encourage you to stay updated on the latest research and information by following the World Health Organization while they try to stay ahead of the developing story and publish additional research. 

 

Rescue updates for a smile

The ever evolving news stories about the coronavirus has made it hard to find the small joys in the world. Did you know that animal shelters have been impacted from the changes in our society? Since many states and cities have issued stay at home ordinances, the shelters are seeing fewer visitors, fewer volunteers and fewer adoptions. But they are still working tirelessly to get animals to forever homes. If you’re considering adopting a new pet, our partner adoption centers are trying to find homes for a growing surplus of animals of all shapes and sizes.

If you’re looking for a bit of inspiring news, check out the stories below about our passengers that have found a new loving forever home.

Buster’s new digs!

Buster was found on the side of the road in New Mexico after being hit by a car. Two good samaritans took him to the vet not knowing if he would survive the night. After a rough patch Buster has found a family and is thriving!

Buster truly is a gentle giant. At 70lbs of love, he thinks he is a lap dog. Totally unaware of his size, Buster will plop himself on your lap at any time to make himself comfortable. He is also always in the mood for some scratches and cuddles. From daily nightly walks, being cozy at the foot of the couch, to anxiously awaiting kids from their day at school, Buster is at home.

 

Archibald finds a family 💙

Sometimes it is just meant to be. When Archibald (formally Duke Kaboom) found his family, they were a little apprehensive. Two thirds of the humans had never had a dog before and it was essential to find a dog that had the perfect personality and temperament. Enter the sweetheart goofball, Archibald Jones!  Archibald flew on the Big Dog and landed with our awesome partners One Tail at a Time PDX and found his family soon after!

 

Although Archibald comes from the warmer climate of El Paso, TX, he has really adapted to the rainy winter days of Portland, OR. He enjoys the smells and sights of the neighborhood, picking treats at the local pet store, and even the family cat! Archi is an active pet but is learning through rewards and practicing manners training. Watching Archi come out of his shell and bond with his new family has been a delight. Archibald is family.

“As our first family dog, (and the first dog ever for 2/3 of the humans in the family) it was essential that found a dog with the perfect personality and temperament to compliment us. Enter the sweetheart goofball, Archibald Jones (formally Duke Kaboom) who couldn’t be a better fit.

When he’s not enjoying the deep relaxation of “his” couch, Archi can be found taking in the sights and smells of our neighborhood, getting pets and choosing treats at the local pet store, along with playing with his many toys. He’s not spoiled though. Archi earns his rewards by actively participating in manners training, learning to cohabitate with one grouchy house cat, and being the absolute best boy.

The cold and rainy Portland winter days have taken some getting used to for all of us, particularly our pupper from El Paso, but the joy of watching Archi come out of his shell and bond with everyone in the family, (yes, even the cat a little bit) has warmed our hearts.

Our family will forever be thankful to OTAT PDX and Dog is My CoPilot for all the work they do to help wonderful dogs find their forever family. ”

Cheers,

Colleen, Ryan and Violet (caregivers of Dippers and Archibald Jones)

You can make a forever home!

We hope that by sharing these stories of love during a time of crisis, others will be inspired to help shelter animals just like Buster and Archibald. Animal shelters across our nation are making the hard decision to close their doors to the public because of the coronavirus pandemic. Let’s work together to ensure animals in shelters across our nation are safe. To find a shelter or rescue near you, visit this page.

13,000 Animals Saved: Our Life Saving Summer

We’ve had an amazing summer and recently flew our 13,000th animal to safety ❤️❤️❤️

This sweet boy flew on the Big Dog this week to our partner rescue group Bounce Animal Rescue. Busta was hit by a car on September 10th in New Mexico and was found covered in blood and couldn’t walk. The rescue team thought he would have to be euthanized and rushed him to the local animal hospital. After lots of love, a bath, and meds, Busta was slowly recovering and stole the hearts of our partners at Amazing Grace Pet Rescue. He had a lot of head trauma, cracked jaw and broken bones in his face and still faced a few weeks of recovery.

 

Busta fully recovered at the end of September and was flown to Colorado on Monday as the 13,000th passenger with Dog Is My CoPilot!

We can’t express enough thanks to Amazing Grace Pet Rescue for saving Busta’s life and to Bounce Animal Rescue for accepting him into your program to help find him a loving forever home! Busta, like most pit bull and pit mixes was a great candidate for adoption. Like any dog, it’s important to have patience when welcoming a new animal into your family, stay positive and focus on training. Finding a home for pit bulls can be challenging and they’re the number one breed euthanized in shelters across the country. Unfortunately, pit bulls are often overlooked by potential adopters because of myths and misconceptions about the breed. Next time you visit your local adoption center, take a minute to see if you can find any pit bulls and you might discover the perfect animal for your family.

Thank you! We could not do this without the support of everyone in our community. If you would like to make a life saving gift today and help us fly more animals to safety  you can do so here: www.dogcopilot.org/donate

A huge thank you to the Petco Foundation for their support and sponsoring our flight that flew our 13,000th passenger to safety !

 

Celebrating 12,000 animals saved!

This week, we flew our 12,000th passenger to safety!! ❤️❤️❤️   Thumbelina, an eight week old chihuahua, who was abandoned on a deserted road, now has the chance of a lifetime to find her forever home! 

The Big Dog picked up Thumbelina in Hobbs, NM and flew her to safety. As you can see, she’s fitting in perfectly with her new foster family. 

Thank you to everyone that has helped save our first 12,000 lives: shelters, rescue groups and all of you! If you’d like to join the celebration, please consider making a $12 gift in honor of this milestone. 

We’re back in the air today flying rescued dogs and cats to safety. Don’t miss this Facebook post from Pilot Peter with in-air updates from our most recent flight

 

How Dog Is My CoPilot Transports Dogs To Rescue

Every day over 2,000 healthy dogs and cats are euthanized in our nations shelters— the result of too many animals and too few homes. At Dog Is My Co Pilot, we are working to reduce euthanasia rates by transporting animals from places with overcrowded shelters to adoption centers in geographic regions where loving families are waiting to adopt them.

In our short history, we have flown over 11,000 animals to safety.

DIMC flies as many animals as possible in a single flight to maximize efficiency.  DIMC does not charge our partners organizations for our transport services. As opposed to long-distance ground transportation or the red tape of commercial flights, transporting animals via private aircraft is efficient and affordable — just $50 per animal, per flight. But resources are always in demand and DIMC looks to the public to keep flying.

DIMC’s success is due to its dedicated team of on the ground volunteers, partner animal rescue organizations and financial contributors. Here is a list of frequently asked questions to provide more background on our service:

Where Do We Fly?

We fly from overcrowded shelters, primarily in Texas, Arizona, New Mexico and California to destination animal rescue organizations located primarily in Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Utah, Washington and Wyoming.

What Type Of Aircraft Do We Fly?

Dog Is My CoPilot operates a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan, aka ‘The Big Dog’. Pilot Peter says, “with a 675HP turbine engine up front, there is more than enough power to fly abandoned dogs and cats to their new homes!”

How Many Animals Can You Transport On One Flight?

The Big Dog was retrofitted from a 12-passenger plane to one that can carry up to 250 animals dependent on animal and crate size.

Is It Safe For Animals To Fly?

Each animal that is transported is required to have a health certificate, vaccinations and have been examined by a veterinarian prior to flight. All pet passengers travel in crates to ensure their safety while flying.

What Type of Animals Do You Fly? 

DIMC’s passengers are predominantly dogs (80 percent versus 20 percent cats) who come from about 20 source shelters. Despite being called kill shelters, these open-admission shelters, often in crowded municipal areas, have staff that want the best outcome for the animals in their care — animals that may have been dumped at the shelter or born on the streets and removed for public health and safety reasons. DIMC rescue flights make working at those shelters a little more hopeful.

If you have any other qeustions, please do not hesitate to contact us flightupdates@dogcopilot.org